The Wiener Library

For the Study of the Holocaust & Genocide

Fate Unknown: The Search for the Missing after the Holocaust

Access information

This exhibition is the ground floor.

Step-free access is available to all floors of the building.

Large print guides are available at reception.

Find out more about accessibility at the Library.

Opening hours

Monday-Friday 10.00am-5.00pm

Tuesday 10am-7:30pm

Saturday-Sunday Closed

Find out more about upcoming closures.

22 February 2018 – 30 May 2018

Learn about global efforts made after the Holocaust to find Zuzana Knobloch and millions of others like her. © WL Photo Archive

Learn about global efforts made after the Holocaust to find Zuzana Knobloch and millions of others like her. © WL Photo Archive

By the end of World War II, millions of people had been murdered or displaced by war and genocide. Families and communities were torn apart. Many were missing, and some people’s fates remain unclear to this day.

Despite immense logistical challenges, a number of charities, such as the British Red Cross Society and the Jewish Relief Unit, attempted to help find missing people and reunite families. Their efforts came together what became known as the International Tracing Service (ITS).

Co-curated with Professor Dan Stone (Royal Holloway, University of London), this exhibition tells the remarkable, little-known story of the agonising search for the missing after the Holocaust. Drawing upon The Wiener Library’s family document collections and its digital copy of the ITS archive, one of the largest document collections related to the Holocaust in the world, the exhibition considers the legacy of the search for descendants of those affected by World War II, and the impact of fates unknown.

Fate Unknown Event Series

The exhibition run will include a series of events designed to amplify themes in the exhibition. All the events are free but space is limited – please register to attend below.

 

In partnership with the Holocaust Research Institute, Royal Holloway University of London, with support from the Royal Holloway Research Strategy Fundthe Leverhulme Trust, and the International Tracing Service (ITS).

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